MILE HIGH METEORITES

Mile High Meteorites was established in 1996, one of the first meteorite businesses on the internet and soon became the place where beginning and experienced meteorite collectors could purchase rare and exotic meteorites.   We offer many types of meteorites for sale, including: iron meteorites, stony-iron (pallasite) meteorites, achondrite meteorites, meteorites from the Moon and Mars,  and historic meteorites with documentation. Many of the meteorites we sell are used for meteorite jewelry, meteorite knives, inlays within dinosaur bone, and other artisanal forms.

Mile High Meteorites founder and president Matt Morgan, oversees all operations of the business. He spent the last two decades building one of the most trustworthy and respected meteorite businesses on the internet.

We have served the collecting and museum community -worldwide- through sales, exchanges, donations, and consultation. We thank all of our past customers and welcome all our new ones to the experience of meteorite collecting.

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SALES INVENTORY

Certificates of Authenticity and additional photos available upon request

Imilac Pallasite 46g

Imilac, Chile (Pallasite)

This complete slice of the Imilac pallasite is polished to a mirror finish on both sides. The olivine (peridot) crystals are golden-yellow in color - cosmic jewels! The Imilac pallasite was first recovered from the Atacama Desert in Chile back in 1822. 46 gram slice rimmed by the original exterior with glowing translucent olivine.

NWA 13638 Lunar Breccia Meteorite

NWA 13638, Algeria (Lunar Breccia)

NWA 13638 is a lunar polymict melt breccia, recovered in 2020 from Algeria. Rock clasts that comprise the bulk of the breccia include angular fragments of basalts, anorthosite, and microbreccias. Graphic granite fragments are present that contain a silica phase, orthoclase, ziconolite, tranqulitiet and apatite. Mineral fragments are mostly pyroxene and plagioclase with minor amounts of olivine and trace amounts of silica phases and apatite. The matrix is glassy and black and is visually beautiful. Generally composed of basalt and highland rocks with a significant KREEPY fragment. Incredible 52.1 gram complete slice with mirror finish on one side and matte finish on the other.

We have published an abstract on this meteorite at the 2021 Lunar and Planetary Sciences Conference. Here is a link:
https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2021/pdf/1501.pdf

NWA 13877 CK3.0

NWA 13877, Morocco (CK 3.0-3,2)

NWA 13877 is a rare example of a Karoonda-type carbonaceous chondrite named after a meteorite recovered in the Karoonda region of Australia in 1930. The NWA 13877 is related to CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites which contain abundant magnetite and unique calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) which formed in the early nebula during the formation of our solar system. This slice of NWA 13877, classified by New Mexico's Institute of Meteoritics contains the above mentioned CAIs plus abundant chondrules within its greyish-brown colored matrix. Classified as a CK3 with characteristics of a CK3.0-3.2 which means it is an example of a meteorite with virtually unaltered carbonaceous material. 38.02 gram complete slice ~2 mm in thickness.

Sikhote-Alin 205g oriented meteorite

Sikhote-Alin, Russia (Iron-IIAB)

Wow! Beautifully oriented Sikhote-Alin meteorite with thumbprints and flow lines. Very hard to obtain these days with a shape like this! 205 gram complete specimen. More images available.

Esquel 133.4g Pallasite Meteorite

Esquel, Argentina (Pallasite)

One look at this meteorite and you will understand why the Esquel pallasite is known as the "King of the Pallasites" amongst collectors, The Esquel pallasite is prized for its golden gem-quality peridot (olivine) crystals, some can be faceted for jewelry. This 133.4 gram slice is etched on both sides and has a long edge of the original exterior. An incredible specimen!

NWA 10553 5.8g Meteorite

NWA 10553, Morocco (Eucrite breccia)

The NWA 10553 meteorite is a brecciated eucrite that originated from an asteroid parent body. Its age ranges between 4.4 to 4.5 billion years and is determined to be ejection debris from an impact event on the asteroid body.
This slice cut has tan-colored clasts set in a black fine-grained matrix that contains scattered augite-pyroxene and minor amounts of other minerals. 5.8 gram, thin slice with mirror polished face.

Elbert Colorado 17.4 gram LL6 Meteorite

Elbert, Colorado (LL6)

On January 1, 1998 a bright fireball was seen traveling west to east over Pikes Peak in central Colorado.  The meteorite was subsequently recovered by a boy rockhunting on March 4, 2000.  The meteorite was eventually purchased by Matt Morgan and Gary Curtiss.  The Elbert meteorite is an extremely fresh LL6 chondrite. This nearly complete slice, rimmed by black crust, comes from the main mass and was wire-saw cut for maximum surface area (65mm X 58 mm). This is my last slice of this incredibly rare Colorado witnessed fall  Slice weighs 17.4 grams.

St. Saint-Severin LL6 meteorite weighing 28.87g

Saint-Severin, France (LL6)

On June 27, 1966, residents of Saint-Séverin, France and nearby villages witnessed a series of explosions and a sonic boom.  Not long after, a meteorite of 113 kg was extracted from a crater that measured 60 cm in depth and 80 cm in diameter.  This 28.87 gram complete slice comes from my large mass that I acquired from Robert Haag.  The slice is beautifully brecciated, has some fusion crust and measures a sizable 120 mm X 95 mm!

Turgut Meteorite 82.9g

Turgut, Turkey (Iron-Ungrouped, fineest octahedrite)

This is an attractive iron meteorite with a similar appearche to Gibeon.  The original mass was found in 1999 by a Turkish farmer and was only recently classified as a rare ungrouped finest octahedrite iron meteorite. 82.9 gram slice etched on both sides with a rim of brown crust.

Sericho 231g Pallasite

Sericho, Kenya (Pallasite)

Nice affordable example of the Sericho Pallasite from Kenya. In 2016, two brothers were searching for their camels and came across several large, dense stones west of the village of Habaswein and south of Sericho, Kenya. They spent several weeks collecting them with engine hoists and moving them to their homes in Habaswein. Though recognized as meteorites in 2016, the masses had been known to camel-herders for decades. One village elder said that as a child, he and his brothers would play on top of the stones.
231 gram complete slice, thin cut, not polished, and encased in resin for preservation. Olivine are transparent.

Aletai Meteorite 132g

Aletai, China (Iron-IIIE-anomalous)

Several masses totaling nearly 74 tons were discovered over a broad are in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China. The first mass was discovered in 1898. Thin, rectangular slice with an outstanding Widmanstatten pattern and inclusions. Etched on both sides. 132 gram slice.

NWA 5546 Carbonaceous Chondrite Meteorite

NWA 5546, Morocco (CV3)

Amazing multicolored chondrules in this thin slice of a CV-type carbonaceous chondrite. Very affordable for this classification as well. 29.4 gram end section.

Aguas Zarcas CM2 Meteorite 68g

Aguas Zarcas (Carbonaceous Chondrite, CM2)

Rare carbonaceous chondrite type CM2 that was witnessed to fall after a bright meteor appeared on April 23, 2019 in Costa Rica.  The Aguas Zarcas (like the Murchison, Australia meteorite) contains EXTRATERRESTRIAL AMINO ACIDS (the building blocks of life).  This piece was recovered within days of the fall, is about 50% complete and weighs 68 grams.

Krymka LL3.2 meteorite 24.47g

Krymka (Chondrite LL3.2)

Stunning 24.47 gram part slice of a very rare LL3.2 chondrite. The Krymka meteorite was observed to fall on January 21, 1946 in the Ukraine.  It is a very primitive chondrite (thus the LL3.2 designation) having undergone very little metamorphism on its parent body.  The slice is packed with multi-colored chondrules and is rimmed by fresh fusion crust on the natural edges. Kyrmka also contains "mysterite" which are dark patches of unknown celestial origin. Slice comes with copies of two labels from the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv.

Imilac Pallasite 75 g

Imilac, Chile (Pallasite)

A true centerpiece of a meteorite collection! This complete slice of the Imilac pallasite is polished to a mirror finish on both sides. One of the largest slices of Imilac that we have offered in over 10 years. The olivine (peridot) crystals are golden-yellow in color - cosmic jewels! The Imilac pallasite was first recovered from the Atacama Desert in Chile back in 1822. 75 gram slice rimmed by the original exterior with glowing olivine.

Berthoud Colorado 5.6 gram Eucrite Meteorite

Berthoud, Colorado (Eucrite)

On October 5, 2004 John, Megan, and Casper Whiteis were outside when they heard "whistling" noise and a thud. Approximately 100 feet away, they saw a dust cloud in their horse pen. Only minutes later, they recovered a 960 gram meteorite from a shallow pit in the pen. This slice was acquired through a trade with the University of New Mexico Institute of Meteoritics and is an exceedingly rare eucrite achondrite fall from the U.S.  Comes with UNM specimen card.  Slice is 5.6 grams and has a edge of fusion crust.

Seymchan 65.6g

Seymchan, Russia (Pallasite)

A sample of the inner workings of an asteroid! Gorgeous and very stable stony-iron pallasite with gem-quality olivine set in an iron-nickel matrix. Pallasites give us a glimpse of the internal structure of differentiated asteroids as their chemical composition and visual texture suggest they formed deep within their parent body. 65.6 gram slice with golden olivine (peridot), natural back and etched iron.

Seymchan Meteorite

Seymchan, Russia (Pallasite)

A sample of the inner workings of an asteroid! Gorgeous and very stable stony-iron pallasite with gem-quality olivine set in an iron-nickel matrix. Pallasites give us a glimpse of the internal structure of differentiated asteroids as their chemical composition and visual texture suggest they formed deep within their parent body. 86.8 gram end section with golden olivine (peridot), natural back and etched iron.

Murchison Meteorite CM2 1.18g

Murchison, Australia (Carbonaceous Chondrite-CM2)

The Murchison meteorite fell on September 28, 1969 near the village of Murchison in southeastern Australia. Murchison is one of the most studied meteorites of all time. It is rich in carbon, contains amino acids and calcium-aluminum inclusions. In 2020, researchers determined Murchison contains silicon-carbide minerals that are neary 7 billion years old! This is becoming extremely hard to obtain due to its scientific importance.
1.40 gram slice (no fusion crust).

Allende Meteorite 45.6g

Allende, Mexico (Caronaceous Chondrite CV3)

Fresh, nearly complete stone of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite.  The Allende meteorite is the most studied meteorite so far. It was found to contain graphite and diamond, and amino acids, some of which are not found on Earth!  Just recently scientists discovered it contains and iron and lithium-rich protein of extraterrestrial origin. 45.6 gram individual with fresh fusion crust.

Chelyabinsk Meteorite 49.5

Chelyabinsk, Russia (LL5)

49.0 gram stone with velvety black fusion crust and brecciated interior. This is from the famed "Chelyabinsk Event" of February 15, 2013 that damaged 7200 buildings, caused almost 1500 injuries and deposited over 1000 kgs of meteorites.

Peekskill New York Meteorite 2.25g

Peekskill, New York, USA (H6 breccia)

This is a slice of the famous Peekskill, New York meteorite that was captured on video from a high school football game.  On October 9, 1992 a very bright fireball was seen over several eastern states; the resulting 12 kg meteorite ended up crashing through the rear of Michelle Knapp's red Chevy Malibu.  This is a very tough to obtain meteorite and has an incredible story to go with it! 2.25 gram slice with veining.

Aiquile 62.1g meteorite

Aiquile, Bolivia (H5)

On November 20, 2016, after the appearance of a bright fireball, stones fell in a strewn field of at least 12 × 2 km in several communities within Aiquile  The main bolide fragmentation occurred over the Tablamayu community. In the Cruz Loma community, C. Veizaga witnessed the fall of the largest stone (36.3 kg) about 500 m from him.  62.1 gram 90% complete individual with black fusion crust.

Steinbach Germany 3.4g

Steinbach, Germany (Iron-IVA Anomalous with silicate inclusions)

A rare German iron that was found in 1724 but may be related to a fireball witnessed in 1164 or 1545.  Steinbach was the first classified anomalous IVA iron.  3.4 gram slice with collection label.

NWA 13134 Mars Shergottite 5.74 g

NWA 13134, Morocco (Martian Shergottite)

Quite fresh example of a Martian Shergottite. You can clearly see the individual pyroxene crystals and some black glass pockets of melt. There is a small edge of fusion crust on this stunning 5.74 gram complete slice.

NWA 10153 Nakhlite 0.86g

NWA 10153, Morocco (Martian Nakhlite)

A rarely-seen slice of a Nakhlite is available here. This 0.86 gram slice was cut from my large fragment that was examined by the University of New Mexico and was determined to be paired to NWA 10153. Nakhlites were formed from basaltic magma about 1.3 billion years ago. They contain augite and olivine crystals. It has been shown that the Nakhlites were infused with liquid water around 620 million years ago and that they were ejected from Mars around 10.75 million years ago by an asteroid impact. They fell to Earth within the last 10,000 years. Slice is rimmed by epoxy for cutting purposes.

Sikhote-Alin Meteorite 89 grams

Sikhote-Alin, Russia (Iron-IIAB)

Nicely thumbprinted 89 gram complete Sikhote-Alin meteorite.  Examples like these are tough to find these days.

Aguas Zarcas 3.20

Aguas Zarcas (CM2), Costa Rica

Rare carbonaceous chondrite type CM2 that was witnessed to fall after a bright meteor appeared on April 23, 2019 in Costa Rica. The Aguas Zarcas (like the Murchison, Australia meteorite) contains EXTRATERRESTRIAL AMINO ACIDS (the building blocks of life). Stunning 3.20 gram slice with a thick edge of fusion crust.

Sericho Kenya Pallasite 71.2g

Sericho, Kenya (Pallasite)

Nice affordable example of the Sericho Pallasite from Kenya. In 2016, two brothers were searching for their camels and came across several large, dense stones west of the village of Habaswein and south of Sericho, Kenya. They spent several weeks collecting them with engine hoists and moving them to their homes in Habaswein. Though recognized as meteorites in 2016, the masses had been known to camel-herders for decades. One village elder said that as a child, he and his brothers would play on top of the stones.
71.2 gram end section with polished face and visible olivine.

Vinales Cuba Meteorite 9.45g

Vinales, Cuba (L6)

Vinales fell on February 1st, 2019 near Pinar del Rio, Cuba at about 1 PM local time. The fireball meteor was caught on video and local residents thought it was a crashing plane. One of the meteorites struck a laptop (we have it!) and penetrated roofs. This 9.45 gram complete stone was collected only a few hours after the fall and has black fusion crust!

Wells, TX 43.4g meteorite

Wells, Texas (LL3.3)

This is a 53.4 gram complete slice of the Wells, Texas LL3.3 from my personal collection. The Wells meteorite was a single stone 4135 gram total recovery in 1985.  The chondrule field on Wells is amazing! Former Jim Schwade Collection.

NWA 12269 Mars Meteorite

NWA 12269 (Martian Shergottite)

The NWA 12269 Mars meteorite was classified in December 2018 as a Martian shergottite. Geologically, the meteorite is of igneous texture with a small proportion of glass or crypto-crystalline material. This slice of Mars weighs 1.32 grams.

NWA 12269 Mars Meteorite 3.5g

NWA 12269 (Martian Shergottite)

The NWA 12269 Mars meteorite was classified in December 2018 as a Martian shergottite. Geologically, the meteorite is of igneous texture with a small proportion of glass or crypto-crystalline material. This slice of MARS weighs 3.5 grams.

Aguas Zarcas 1.32g

Aguas Zarcas (CM2), Costa Rica

Rare carbonaceous chondrite type CM2 that was witnessed to fall after a bright meteor appeared on April 23, 2019 in Costa Rica. The Aguas Zarcas (like the Murchison, Australia meteorite) contains EXTRATERRESTRIAL AMINO ACIDS (the building blocks of life). 1.32 gram nearly complete individual.

NWA 10822 Lunar Meteorite

NWA 10822, Morocco/Algeria (Lunar)

A very affordable complete fragment with many anorthosite clasts in a grayish matrix.  Orange spots are areas of desert soil.  This feldspathic breccia likely originates from the nearside of the moon.
20.5g fragment.

NWA 10822 lunar 6.88g

NWA 10822, Morocco/Algeria (Lunar)

This feldspathic breccia likely originates from the nearside of the moon.
6.88 gram complete slice with mirror polish. A stunning and affordable example of a piece of our nearest neighbor.

Sericho Kenya Pallasite 122g

Sericho, Kenya (Pallasite)

Nice affordable example of the Sericho Pallasite from Kenya. In 2016, two brothers were searching for their camels and came across several large, dense stones west of the village of Habaswein and south of Sericho, Kenya. They spent several weeks collecting them with engine hoists and moving them to their homes in Habaswein. Though recognized as meteorites in 2016, the masses had been known to camel-herders for decades. One village elder said that as a child, he and his brothers would play on top of the stones.
122 gram complete slice, thin cut, not polished, and encased in resin for preservation. Olivine are transparent.

Zagora 008 39.7g Eucrite

Zagora 008, Morocco (Fragmental monomict eucrite breccia)

A new and fresh eucrite breccia from the Zagora area of Morocco.  Composition is approximately 60% pyroxene and 35% plagioclase. The pyroxene compositions are uniformly consistent with a single cumulate eucrite lithology. Pyroxenes are highly equilibrated with distinct high-Ca and low-Ca compositional separation. 22.5 gram slice with weathered crust.

Ghubara Meteorite 59.8g

Ghubara, Oman (Xenolithic L5)

Ghubara is an underappreciated meteorite-It contains trapped gases related to the solar-wind and rock fragments of different chondritic types. From 2018 study of Ghubara, the scientists concluded "we favor a scenario in which a large impact event on L-chondrite asteroid 470 Ma ago caused release, mobilization, fractionation and redistribution of accumulated gases on the Ghubara parent body. The Ghubara breccia was formed at that event and occluded trapped gases into the voids." Ghubara was one of the first meteorites found in the "hot" deserts of Oman, back in 1954. 59.8 gram complete slice with mirror polish.

plainview meteoirte 29.58g

Plainview (1917), Texas (H5)

29.58 gram end section with painted numbers C33.6 (Institute of Meteoritics). Comes with original IOM specimen card.

NWA 6560 31g

NWA 6560, Morocco (Howardite)

Caramel-colored fusion crust with flow lines are characteristics of this attractive achondrite. 31.5 gram individual.

Sericho pallasite 158g

Sericho, Kenya (Pallasite)

Nice affordable example of the Sericho Pallasite from Kenya. In 2016, two brothers were searching for their camels and came across several large, dense stones west of the village of Habaswein and south of Sericho, Kenya. They spent several weeks collecting them with engine hoists and moving them to their homes in Habaswein. Though recognized as meteorites in 2016, the masses had been known to camel-herders for decades. One village elder said that as a child, he and his brothers would play on top of the stones.
158 gram complete slice, thin cut, not polished, and encased in resin for preservation. Olivine are transparent.

Gibeon Meteorite 175.2g

Gibeon, Namibia (Iron - IVA, fine octahedrite)

Complete slice with an outstanding Widmanstatten pattern. Polished and etched on both sides.  175 grams.

Abbott 48.7 gram meteorite from UNM

Abbott, New Mexico (H3-5)

Abbott meteorite was found between 1951 and 1960 in Colfax County, New Mexico with a total weight of about 21 kg. It is an unusual class of chondritic meteorite called a regolith breccia containing both carbonaceous and chondritic fragments, melt pockets and trapped solar-wind gases. This 48.7 gram complete stone is from University of New Mexico Institute of Meteoritics collection. Specimen is accompanied by UNM specimen card and bag.

Sikhote-Alin Meteorite Shrapnel 76g

Sikhote-Alin, Russia (Iron IIAB)

Shrapnel variety of the Sikhote-Alin meteorite that formed when the incoming bolide exploded before impact. In as-found condition! 76 grams.

NWA 7493 Lunar Meteorite

NWA 7493 (Lunar, Feldspathic Breccia)

Six stones were recovered in 2011 near Zag, Morocco. The total recovered weight was 503 grams. This meteorite is distinguished by containing a rare granophyre clast. Slice has a gray matrix with lithic clasts and white feldspar grains (full description).
Slice weighs 8.89 grams

Zagora 008 Eucrite Meteorite 66g

Zagora 008, Morocco (Fragmental monomict eucrite breccia)

A new and fresh eucrite breccia from the Zagora area of Morocco. Composition is approximately 60% pyroxene and 35% plagioclase. The pyroxene compositions are uniformly consistent with a single cumulate eucrite lithology. Pyroxenes are highly equilibrated with distinct high-Ca and low-Ca compositional separation. 66.0 gram end section with weathered crust.

Esquel Pallasite Meteorite 53.9g

Esquel, Argentina (Pallasite)

One look at this meteorite and you will understand why the Esquel pallasite is known as the "King of the Pallasites" amongst collectors, The Esquel pallasite is prized for its golden gem-quality peridot (olivine) crystals, some can be faceted for jewelry. This 53.9 gram slice is etched on both sides and has an edge of the original exterior. 

Aguas Zarcas 1.15g

Aguas Zarcas, Costa Rica (Carbonaceous Chondrite, CM2)

Rare carbonaceous chondrite type CM2 that was witnessed to fall after a bright meteor appeared on April 23, 2019 in Costa Rica. The Aguas Zarcas (like the Murchison, Australia meteorite) contains EXTRATERRESTRIAL AMINO ACIDS (the building blocks of life). 1.15 gram slice with crust.

Tsarev 26g slice

Tsarev (L5), Russia

The Tsarev meteorite fall probably occurred on December 6, 1922, was recovered in 1968 and recognized as a meteorite in 1979. The meteorite's recovery took place in the fields surrounding the village of Tsarev in the former USSR. This complete slice is full of shiny metalflake, highly polished to a mirror finish and rimmed by weathered fusion crust.  26 gram complete slice.

Sericho Kenya Pallasite 23.7g

Sericho, Kenya (Pallasite)

Nice affordable example of the Sericho Pallasite from Kenya. In 2016, two brothers were searching for their camels and came across several large, dense stones west of the village of Habaswein and south of Sericho, Kenya. They spent several weeks collecting them with engine hoists and moving them to their homes in Habaswein. Though recognized as meteorites in 2016, the masses had been known to camel-herders for decades. One village elder said that as a child, he and his brothers would play on top of the stones.
23.7 gram end section with polished face and visible olivine.

NWA 6137 LL4

NWA 6137, Morocco (LL4)

A beautful end section with a full back that is black crusted with contraction cracks of a very fresh LL4 from Morocco.  One of my favorites. 26.45 grams

NWA 13518 R-chondrite 8.4g

NWA 13518, Algeria/Mali (R 4-5)

A rare R-type chondrite that was recovered near the Mali-Algeria border in 2019. R-chondrites originate from near the surface of chondritic asteroids and are implanted by solar wind gases. The “R” is from the namesake Rumuruti, which fell January 28, 1934 in Kenya. 8.4 gram complete slice with high polish on both sides.

Imilac 13.28g Pallasite

Imilac, Chile (Pallasite)

This complete slice of the Imilac pallasite etched on both sides. The olivine (peridot) crystals are golden-yellow in color - cosmic jewels! The Imilac pallasite was first recovered from the Atacama Desert in Chile back in 1822. 13.28 gram slice rimmed by the original exterior with glowing olivine.

Seymchan 61 gram pallasite

Seymchan, Russia (Pallasite)

A sample of the inner workings of an asteroid! Gorgeous and very stable stony-iron pallasite with gem-quality olivine set in an iron-nickel matrix. Pallasites give us a glimpse of the internal structure of differentiated asteroids as their chemical composition and visual texture suggest they formed deep within their parent body. 61 gram slice with golden olivine (peridot) and etched iron.

Sericho Pallasite 163g

Norton County, Kansas (Aubrite)

Nice affordable example of the Sericho Pallasite from Kenya. In 2016, two brothers were searching for their camels and came across several large, dense stones west of the village of Habaswein and south of Sericho, Kenya. They spent several weeks collecting them with engine hoists and moving them to their homes in Habaswein. Though recognized as meteorites in 2016, the masses had been known to camel-herders for decades. One village elder said that as a child, he and his brothers would play on top of the stones.
163 gram complete slice, thin cut, not polished, and encased in resin for preservation. Olivine are transparent.

Sikhote-Alin sharpnel meteorite 75g

Sikhote-Alin, Russia (Iron - IIAB)

Shrapnel variety of the Sikhote-Alin meteorite that formed when the incoming bolide exploded before impact.  In as-found condition! 75 grams.

Aba Panu L3 Meteorite

Aba Panu, Nigeria (L3)

On the afternoon of 19 April 2018, a large fireball detonated over the Nigerian state of Oyo. This fireball was recorded by NASAs Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) as event 2018-04-19 14:02:27. The meteoroid entered at 20.9 km/s and detonated at an altitude of 30 km at 7.5’N, 3.6’E releasing a calculated total impact energy of 0.23 kt (Meteoritical Bulletin).  74 gram complete thin slice with beautiful chondrules indicative of an L3.

Taza meteorite 27.5g

Taza, Morocco (Iron - Ungrouped Plessitic Octahedrite)

A very rare an unique iron, Taza (NWA 859) was discovered in 2001 and the strewn field of meteorites has since been depleted.  The etch on Taza is stunning, displaying fine needles of kamacite due to the high nickel content of the meteorite. 27.5 gram complete slice.

Cape York Meteorite

Cape York, Greenland (Iron - IIIAB)

The Cape York meteorite is one of the largest known iron meteorites and has a storied history.  At least eight large fragments with a total mass of 58 tons have been recovered with the largest weighing 31 tonnes. It was was used as a source of iron for tools by the local Inughuit for centuries. The first foreigner to view the meteorite was Robert Peary in 1894, with the assistance of Inuit guides. Large pieces are on display at the American Museum of Natural History and the University of Copenhagen Geological Museum.  38.30 gram etched slice with rough-sawed back.

Sikhote-Alin 23.6g

Sikhote-Alin, Russia (Iron - IIAB)

Nice shape and character on this 23.6g complete Sikhote-Alin meteorite.

NWA 6217

NWA 6217 (Carbonaceous Chondrite - CO3)

Complete slice of a rare CO3 type carbonaceous chondrite from the Sahara Desert.  Packed with tiny chondrules indicative of Ornans-type carbonaceous chondrites.
12.9 gram slice.

Vinales Cuba 483 gram Meteorite

Vinales, Cuba (L6)

Vinales fell on February 1st, 2019 near Pinar del Rio, Cuba at about 1 PM local time. The fireball meteor was caught on video and local residents thought it was a crashing plane. One of the meteorites struck a laptop (we have it!) and penetrated roofs.  483 gram individual stone with patches of fusion crust. 

Kainsaz meteorite

Kainsaz, Russia (Carbonaceous Chondrite - CO3.2)

The Kainsaz meteorite fell on September 13, 1937 in Tartarstan and is the only meteorite fall from that republic. It is classified as a rare Ornans-type carbonaceous chondrite. This is a nearly complete 32.8 gram individual.

NWA 13446 1.53g

NWA 13446, Algeria (Olivine-rich Igneous Achondrite)

NWA 13446 is a rare ungrouped cumulate achondrite that consists dominantly of zoned olivine (~90%) with intercumulus assemblages of low-Ca pyroxene, augite and sodic plagioclase-like glass. The polished surface reveals blades of olivine that are layered and blobs of metal. See the Meteoritical Bulletin entry for NWA 13346 here. This 1.53 gram slice has an edge of weathered fusion crust.

NWA 10554 14.48g Eucrite Meteorite

NWA 10554, Morocco (Eucrite)

Eucrites (like this slice of NWA 10554) are simply lava flows from the surface of asteroids.  On occasion they get blasted from the surface and make their way to earth as meteorites.  This handsome slice is typical of breccaited eucrites, being composed of broken fragments of basaltic material.  Also you won't find a more affordable eucrite! 14.48 gram complete slice with fusion crust.

Aletai iron meteorite

Aletai, China (Iron - IIIE-anomalous)

Several masses totaling nearly 74 tons were discovered over a broad are in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China. The first mass was discovered in 1898. Thin, rectangular slice with original exterior and outstanding Widmanstatten pattern and inclusions. Etched on both sides. 34.2 gram slice.

NWA 13757

NWA 13757, Algeria (Lunar melt breccia)

Breccia composed of mineral clasts of anorthite, olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, pigeonite and augite plus mafic lithic clasts in a very fine grained matrix containing partially altered kamacite, both high-Ti and low-Ti chromite, and minor secondary barite and celestite. These specimens are richer in mafic components by comparison with typical feldspathic lunar breccias. Mafic lithic clasts include microgabbro, subophitic olivine-bearing mare basalt and quench-textured basalt lithologies. 10.36 gram complete slice.

Sikhote-Alin Meteorite 41

Sikhote-Alin, Russia (Iron - IIAB)

Nicely thumbprinted 41 gram complete Sikhote-Alin meteorite. Examples like these are tough to find these days.

Sikhote-Alin 10g

Sikhote-Alin, Russia (Iron - IIAB)

Good small piece with character and fusion crust. Weighs 10.0 grams.

Munoionalusta 248

Muonionalusta, Sweden (Iron - IVA)

The Muonionalusta meteorites were first recognized in 1906 in Sweden.  Meteorite hunters found a few hundred kilograms of rounded iron boulders mixed in with glacial till, which was dated to be ~800,000 years old.  When cut and etched the Muonionalusta irons display a beautiful Widmanstatten pattern similar to the Gibeon meteorite.  This 249 gram complete slice has been etched and stabilized.

Muonionalusta 756g meteorite

Muonionalusta, Sweden (Iron - IVA)

The Muonionalusta meteorites were first recognized in 1906 in Sweden. Meteorite hunters found a few hundred kilograms of rounded iron boulders mixed in with glacial till, which was dated to be ~800,000 years old. When cut and etched the Muonionalusta irons display a beautiful Widmanstatten pattern similar to the Gibeon meteorite. This 756 gram complete slice has been etched and stabilized.

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